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Nikikw Designs

ANISHINAABE BIMISHIMO Copper Jingle Earrings

ANISHINAABE BIMISHIMO Copper Jingle Earrings


$70.00CAD


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Product Description

Copper wire made with Copper Jingle
Buffalo Bone Bead
Dangled down is beautiful light blue and finished off with copper beaded fringe.  They look beautiful on! Pictures do not do them justice. Great Conversation 

History Lesson ????

The Jingle Dress Dance began with the northern tribe Ojibwe in the early 1900s

The dress was first seen in a dream. A medicine man’s granddaughter grew sick, and as he slept his spirit guides came to him and told him to make a Jingle dress for her. They said if she danced in it the dress would heal her.


The Jingle dress was made, and the tribe came together to watch her dance. At first, she was too sick to dance alone and so her tribe carried her, but after a little time she was able to dance alone, cured of her sickness.

It’s likely that the sickness she was experiencing was a part of the 1918 flue pandemic, which hit the Native American communities hard close to the Great Lakes. This was closely followed by a federal ban on ritual dancing in the 1920s on reservations. The dance has since been not only a dance of healing but also one of pride.

 

Here is a little history on Anishinaabe Bimishimo Corporation.

16-year-old Émilie McKinney is from Swan Lake First Nation, Manitoba and is a bilingual student (French and English) at École Régional Notre-Dame, an international dancer (hoop, fancy, jingle, traditional) and a artist who wanted to make herself a new jingle dress. We (Natalie Foidart, her mom and Émilie McKinney) called our local supplier to get jingles and he explained that he has since retired. There is no one locally who makes them so Émilie decided that she wanted to make locally made and available jingles. 

indigenous jewerly native beaded

Other Products from Vendor

Product Description

Copper wire made with Copper Jingle
Buffalo Bone Bead
Dangled down is beautiful light blue and finished off with copper beaded fringe.  They look beautiful on! Pictures do not do them justice. Great Conversation 

History Lesson ????

The Jingle Dress Dance began with the northern tribe Ojibwe in the early 1900s

The dress was first seen in a dream. A medicine man’s granddaughter grew sick, and as he slept his spirit guides came to him and told him to make a Jingle dress for her. They said if she danced in it the dress would heal her.


The Jingle dress was made, and the tribe came together to watch her dance. At first, she was too sick to dance alone and so her tribe carried her, but after a little time she was able to dance alone, cured of her sickness.

It’s likely that the sickness she was experiencing was a part of the 1918 flue pandemic, which hit the Native American communities hard close to the Great Lakes. This was closely followed by a federal ban on ritual dancing in the 1920s on reservations. The dance has since been not only a dance of healing but also one of pride.

 

Here is a little history on Anishinaabe Bimishimo Corporation.

16-year-old Émilie McKinney is from Swan Lake First Nation, Manitoba and is a bilingual student (French and English) at École Régional Notre-Dame, an international dancer (hoop, fancy, jingle, traditional) and a artist who wanted to make herself a new jingle dress. We (Natalie Foidart, her mom and Émilie McKinney) called our local supplier to get jingles and he explained that he has since retired. There is no one locally who makes them so Émilie decided that she wanted to make locally made and available jingles. 

indigenous jewerly native beaded